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How To Install Rear View Camera

We have all heard horror stories about people reversing over a pet, or even worse, a child. The truth is that rear view mirrors just don't provide enough visibility of what is going on behind your car to avoid an accident. Most newer cars come with rear view cameras and now you can purchase and install your own to maximize driving safety.

Here's how to install rear view camera:

1. Buy A Rear View Camera Kit. Most kits come ready with everything that you will need to install the camera as well as a handy instruction manual. You should not need to purchase any additional materials however you should read the box to ensure that the kit is all inclusive.

Alternatively, you can approach a local car mechanic or parts dealer to provide you with the best car rear view system for your make and model of car. They will probably also provide an installation service for you, minimizing the hassle and fuss in getting the latest technology installed on your car.

2. Install The Rear View Camera. Simply follow the instructions for installation that come with the kit. Those of us who are not particularly handy may need some extra help.

Do a little research and check out reviews to find the most user friendly car rear view system camera kit. Also look online for videos that will give you a step-by-step visual guide to the installation process. Make sure that any video material is relevant to the brand, make and model of rear view camera that you have purchased.

3. Get The Necessary Tools. You shouldn't need anything more than a wrench and a screw diver to complete the installation. The wrench is to remove your rear licence plate to place the camera and the screw driver to tighten any screws.

However, in some cases, a hand drill may be necessary to make hole so that a wire can be passed into the trunk of the car. Just read the car kit you want to purchase to ensure you have the necessary tools.

4. Test The Camera Kit. After installation you should check whether the rear view camera is fully operational. If there are any problems, look for trouble shooting tips in the user manual or online. Check for any loose connections or wires that have been incorrectly connected.

Should you not be able to solve the problem, you can contact the manufacturer for advice.

DSLR or Mirrorless Camera

Are the days of the DSLR over? If you believe everything that is being promoted in the digital camera media, then this just might be true. If you talk to professional photographers, then you might just hear something a lot different. What we would like to do is take an objective look at the issue of DSLR or mirrorless. We agree that mirrorless is the future but that doesn't immeditely spell the death of DSLRs. We would like to go over who DSLRs are best for why mirrorless full frame camera will become what most pros and enthusiast will own in the next 10 years.

An argument for the DSLR. I must admit that I'm not a fan of DSLR camera. Yes, I love that they are full frame but for anyone who uses any sensor size smaller than full frame, they are too bulky, heavy and the new mirrorless APS-C and full frames are a better choice. One ares where DSLRs remain to be best is in the amount of native lenses that are available to them. One huge complaint about the most popular full frame mirrorless, the Sony A7 is that it doesn't truly have the lens selection that a professional would need, it doesn't have a lot of fast primes. Also, DSLRs still boot more technology within them and are better for video. DSLRs are not dead yet but they will likely be yesterday's technology in the next 10 years.

The Benefits of Mirrorless Cameras - Basically if you are using anything smaller than full frame, you should own a mirrorless camera. The weight of a DSLR just isn't worth it. The future of digital cameras and even the creation of mirrorless cameras are based on the evolution of how people use digital cameras and how the experience of them can be made better. With a mirrorless, you use today's technology and not the mirror reflex and optical viewfinders of the past. You instead have access to electronic viewfinders that allow you to see the exposure changes while your eye is up to the camera, you get a smaller form factor that is easier to carry and as the full frame versions of these cameras become mature, we will see better lenses for them as well.

So when it comes to DSLR or mirrorless, it is a personal choice, it is a choice based on needed features, lenses and what you need to get the job done.